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Four English hymns that refer to Revelation 3.14-22

Using hymnary.org to search the Psalter Hymnal, Singing the New Testament and Sing! A New Creation, I found four hymns based on Revelation 3.14-22.

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Six connections between Revelation 12 and Revelation 17 (Witherington)

  1. Both the heavenly woman in chapter 12 and the prostitute in chapter 14 are depicted as mothers (Rev. 12.2, 17.5).
  2. Both women are seen in the wilderness at some point (Rev. 12.6, 17.3).
  3. Both chapters mention eating and drinking in connection with death. In Revelation 12.4 the dragon wishes to devour a child as he is born. Revelation 17.6 says that the prostitute drank the blood of the murdered saints.
  4. Revelation 12.1 and 17.4 use the same Greek word to describe women being ‘clothed’ with splendid attire.
  5. Both chapters mention red animals with seven heads and ten horns (the dragon in Revelation 12.3 and the beast in Revelation 17.3).
  6. Revelation 12.7 mentions people who hold the testimony of Jesus, and Revelation 17.6 mentions witnesses of Jesus.

Source: Ben Witherington, Revelation. (Cambridge University Press, 2003).

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Seven connections between the seals in Revelation 6 and the visions in Revelation 19-20 (Tavo)

  1. In Revelation 6.2 there is a rider on a white horse sent out to conquer. In Revelation 19.11, 19.14 there is a rider on a white horse prepared to make battle.
  2. In Revelation 6.8 there is a rider with a great sword, and in Revelation 19.15, 19.21 the rider has a sharp sword.
  3. Death and Hades are mentioned in Revelation 6.8 and they are both thrown into the lake of fire in Revelation 20.13-14.
  4. Revelation 6.9 mentions souls slain on account of the word of God and their witness. Revelation 20.4 mentions souls beheaded for their witness and on account of the word of God.
  5. Heaven vanishes in Revelation 6.14, and heaven flees from sight in Revelation 20.11.
  6. Both Revelation 6.15 and 19.18 mention kings, generals, the powerful, slaves and the free.
  7. Both Revelation 6.17 and 19.15 mention the wrath of God.

Felise Tavo, The structure of the Apocalypse: re-examining a perennial problem. (Novum testamentum 47 no 1 2005), 66.

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Four arguments in favor of tying Revelation 1.9-12a with 1.9b-20 rather than with 1.1-8

Should Revelation 1.9-12a go with 1.1-8 o with 1.12b-20? There are several clear indications that 1.9-12a belong with the vision that follows:

  1. In Revelation 1.9 we begin an autobiographical narrative, which is also what we find in the following section. In contrast, Rev. 1.1-8 is not narrative. There is actually a hodgepodge of subgenres in Rev. 1.1-8: title, beatitude, epistolary greeting, doxology, prophecy and a divine self-identification.
  2. In Revelation 1.9 we begin a first-person narrative, which is what we find continued in Rev. 1.12b-20. By contrast, in 1.1-8 John does not speak in the first-person. John refers to himself in the third-person in the first verses. The only first-person speech in this section is from God, in Rev. 1.8, not from John.
  3. Revelation 1.9-12 is specifically a prophetic commissioning narrative. Jesus is commissioning John to write to the churches. In OT versions of such narratives, such as Isaiah 6, we see both the call narrative and a glorious description of God. That is what we find in Revelation 1.9-20.
  4. Working backwards we see that in Rev. 1.12b we have a mention of John’s turning. In Rev. 1.12a we learned that the turning was to find the source of a voice. In Revelation 1.10-11 we hear the voice for the first time. And Rev. 1.9 sets the stage for the narrative, introducing the protagonist (John) and his setting or circumstances. So all of these verses belong together.

Source: author’s personal study.

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Five evidences for the divinity of Christ in the book of Revelation

  1. Jesus shares the title ‘Alpha and Omega / the First and the Last / the Beginning and the End’ with God the Father himself (Alpha and Omega (Rev. 21:6; 22:13); First and Last (Rev. 1:17; 2:8; 22:13), Beginning and End (Rev. 21:6; 22:13). This is all the more amazing considering that the source of the phrase is Isaiah 44.6, where Yahweh says, “I am the first and I am the last; besides me there is no god.”
  2. The angels in Revelation don’t allow John to worship them, but Jesus is worshiped in Revelation chapter 5.
  3. Jesus shares the throne with God the Father (Rev. 3.21, 22.3)
  4. There is a doxology in Revelation 1.5-6 that is directed to Christ.
  5. Jesus is given many exalted titles in the book (see the names for God in Revelation)

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22 references to Revelation in the Reformed confessions

As a minister in the Christian Reformed Church, I limited myself to the ‘three forms of unity’ (The Belgic Confession, The Heidelberg Catechism and The Canons of Dort), as well as Our World Belongs to God (a contemporary testimony of the Christian Reformed Church), and the Belhar Confession (the status of which is currently being decided by the denomination). In a separate post I will review the references to Revelation in the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Westminster Larger Catechism.
  1. The Belgic Confession, Article 4, recognizes “the Revelation of the apostle John” as one of the canonical books of the Bible.
  2. The Belgic Confession, Article 7, refers to Revelation 22.18-19 to teach that Scripture is sufficient and that no one ought to teach other than what the Bible has taught the church.
  3. The Belgic Confession, Article 37, refers to Revelation 20.12 in its discussion of the judgment of the dead. It interprets “the books will be opened” as referring to the consciences of the resurrected dead.
  4. The Belgic Confession, Article 37, also quotes Revelation 7.17’s promise that on the last day “all tears will be ‘wiped from their eyes.’”
  5. The Heidelberg Catechism, question and answer 31, refers to Revelation 12.10-11 as a promise that God governs, guards and keeps us.
  6. The Heidelberg Catechism, question and answer 51, refers to Revelation 19.11-16 when it says Christ “defends us and keeps us safe from all enemies.”
  7. The Heidelberg Catechism, question and answer 54, refers to Revelation 5.9 as a prooftext that the Son of God has gathered a community “out of the entire human race.”
  8. The Heidelberg Catechism, question and answer 70, refers to Revelation 1.5 to support its discussion of the forgiveness of sins based on Christ’s blood poured out for the believer.
  9. The Heidelberg Catechism, question and answer 73, refers to Revelation 1.5 and 7.14 to say that the blood and Spirit of Christ wash away sins.
  10. The Heidelberg Catechism, question and answer 94, refers to Revelation 19.10 and 22.8-9 in its prohibition of prayer to “saints or to other creatures.”
  11. The Heidelberg Catechism, question and answer 112, refers to Revelation 21.8 for support when it says that the use of lying and deceit “would call down on me God’s intense anger.”
  12. The Heidelberg Catechism, question and answer 117, mentions Revelation 4 as support when it says that we must “humble ourselves” in God’s “majestic presence.”
  13. The Heidelberg Catechism, question and answer 123, refers to Revelation 22.17 and 22.20 in its discussion of the completion of God’s kingdom.
  14. Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony, Section 2, refers to Revelation 4-5 when it affirms that God is king, Christ is victor, his rule has begun, and our world belongs to God.
  15. Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony, Section 6, quotes Revelation 22.20 when it calls out, “Come, Lord Jesus!”
  16. Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony, Section 19, refers to Revelation 11.15 when it affirms that the world is God’s kingdom.
  17. Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony, Section 29, gives Revelation 5 as a reference when it says that Jesus rules the world.
  18. Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony, Section 30, refers to Revelation 7 when it says that people from every language and nation “are gathered into the unity of the body of Christ.”
  19. Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony, Section 38, refers to Revelation 21.9 when it describes the church as the Bride of Christ.
  20. Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony, Section 40, refers to Revelation 19.6-9 when it affirms that Jesus will come again and call believers to the Supper of the Lamb.
  21. Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony, Section 56, refers to Revelation 11.15 to say that God’s “kingdom shall come fully, and our Lord shall rule forever.”
  22. The Belhar Confession, Section 3, refers to Revelation 21-22 when it says that “the church is witness both by word and by deed to the new heaven and the new earth in which righteousness dwells.”

(The Canons of Dort contain no references to the book of Revelation.)

Source: the author’s personal study

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